Equine Breed Menu

Hungarian Horses

Hungarian Horses



No Additional Pictures
Breed Organization
Hungarian Horse Association of America HHAA
Website: http://www.hungarianhorses.org
Native Country
Hungary
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History
The Hungarian Horse is traced back to the original settlers of Hungary, the Magyars. The Magyars were nomadic raiders, a people of the Steppes, descendents of the Huns. They settled in the Carpathian basin 1,000 years ago. The Magyars inherited a horse culture that began in central Asia 6,000 years earlier. As the Hussers of the Hapsburg Empire, they were acknowledged as the supreme light horsemen of all time. These original Magyar horses were crossed with heavier cold bloods for farming and pulling, then crossed back on the finest Arabs, Turks, Andalusians and Lipizzans. During the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, the Hungarian Horses were heavily crossed to the best English and French Thoroughbreds and half-breds that money could buy, along with a continued Oriental influence. The result; a horse of incredible stamina, scope and ride ability. The Hungarian was recognized as the dominant cavalry horse of Europe.

In 1780 the Austro-Hungarian Empire became the first European power to establish a government breeding plan, using the method of farming stallions out to remount agents. Moreover, three breeding farms were established Mezohegyes was selected to procreate the established crosses, Babolna was selected to produce Arabians to use as regenerators, and Kisber was selected to cross Thoroughbreds with the products of Mezohegyes and Babolna, always watching for the characteristics of speed and toughness of the original Hungarian horses. At these farms , only the finest horses, proven representatives of their type, were allowed to breed. Selections were governed by consideration of a horses' performance, conformation, size, straight gaits and disposition. These farms were operated by the Hungarian government without interruption until the Russian invasion at the end of World War II. At that time most of the stock and all of the personnel were evacuated by the German Army to Donnauworth, in Southern Bavaria. Captured from the German Army as an operating breeding farm by our Third Army, the stud farm was used as a remount depot and continued to operate. Colonel Fred L. Hamilton, Chief of the American Army Remount, knowing the Remount situation in the U.S. was far from satisfactory, headed for Europe upon hearing of the German horses that were in the American Zone. Hamilton visited breeding farms at Altefeld, Monsbach and Donnauworth and spent over a month studying the horses qualities. He then selected 152 horses for return to the U.S. Fifty of these were Hungarians taken as spoils of war, before the signing of our armistice with Hungary. These Hungarian horses were thought by many to be the most valuable because of their qualities of durability, economy, speed, endurance and their ability to reproduce according to type.

Most of the Hungarian horses were sent to Fort Reno, Oklahoma and Fort Robinson, Nebraska. Later, when the American Army Remount disbanded, these horses were scattered around the country in government dispersal sales. From that 1945 shipment, the Hungarian horse survived, prospered and evolved into one of the earliest Sport Horse breed registries in America.


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