Canine Breed Menu

Welshie (Welsh Terrier)

Welshie (Welsh Terrier)


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Breed Organization
Welsh Terrier Club of America
Website: http://clubs.akc.org/Welshie (Welsh Terrier)ca
Native Country
Great Britain, Wales
Other Names
Welshie, WT
Life Expectancy
Approximately 10-12 Years
Litter Size
Average 3-6 Puppies
Breed Group
AKC Terrier
Breed Appearance
The Welsh Terrier is colored tan on the head, legs and underbelly while having a black or sometimes grizzle saddle. This is not always the case with female terriers as they are sometimes darker tan all over. The breed is a sturdy and compact dog of about medium size. The tail was usually docked until this was prohibited in the United Kingdom in 2006, being preferred in order to complete the image of a square dog, as tall as it is long. The body shape is rectangular, with an elongated, "brick-like" face. This shape is formed by the whiskers and beard. With pedigrees the face can take a more oval shape and be finer boned and more distinct.

The hair contains two layers, an undercoat that insulates and an abrasive fur on top that protects against dirt, rain, and wind. Welsh Terriers are born mostly all black and during the first year they change the color to standard black and tan grizzle. This breed does not shed. However, the coat requires regular maintenance including brushing and hand stripping. The coat does not moult out but old hairs will eventually be stripped out through play and movement if the coat is not regularly raked. Ungroomed coats can also fade and thin out as the old hair loses color and texture. to keep a moult free house and a good coat on your Welsh Terrier it is necessary to rake out the coat on a regular basis. Welsh terriers need some grooming. Their fur grows a little long. The Welsh Terrier closely resembles a compact Airedale Terrier.


Breed Description
Head: Elongated. Flat skull. Slight stop. Powerful jaws.
Ears: Set on fairly high. Small, v-shaped, folded, carried forward close to the cheeks.
Eyes: Small. Dark color.
Body: Compact. Slightly arched neck of moderate length. Chest well let down. Strong forequarters. Short back. Strong loin.
Tail: Typically docked. Not carried too gaily.
Hair: Hard, wiry, very dense and abundant. Absence of undercoat is a fault.
Coat: Black and tan is preferred. Black grizzle and tan without black markings on the feet.
Size: 39 cm (15,5 in) or less.
Weight: 9 to 9,5 kg (20-21 lb).


History
Developed in Wales, it was bred for its hunting abilities, particularly with badger, fox and otter. The dogs would go down into the dens to drive out the prey for the hunter and would commonly be taken out with packs of hounds. The breed was first shown in England in 1884. Prescott Lawrence first brought the breed to America in 1888. Some of the Welsh Terrier's talents include: hunting, tracking, watchdog, agility and performing tricks.

Behavior
The Welsh Terrier has a typical terrier temperament. In the right hands, it is a happy, lively, and seldom shy or timid dog, but sometimes can have an attitude. The Welsh Terrier is generally friendly with people and dogs but when a challenge is perceived, he will not back down. Dogs of this breed can be devoted friends and can function either as city dogs or as country dogs. Welsh Terriers were developed to hunt independently and this required that they be very assertive and stoic dogs. As a consequence, developing obedience in a Welsh Terrier is a long-term proposition and one has to constantly work on and reinforce the training. They are of average working/obedience intelligence. This, however, does not mean that Welsh Terriers fail to learn or understand commands, just that they tend to make their own decisions; thus the need for constant reinforcement. When acting on their own, they are quite creative and quick in decision making. They also have the potential for excessive barking. Like other terrier breeds, the Welsh Terrier enjoys digging.

A Welsh Terrier is full of energy and requires regular exercise. A run around the yard during the day is insufficient. They become yappy, and if bored, they may explore and potentially cause mischief and damage. Welsh Terriers need a challenge to keep them entertained. For example, they love chasing toys and swimming. He gets along well with children and they love to play and follow a child. However, and they will often tug at pant legs and can knock young ones off their feet. If they are around young children at an early age, they will easily learn to play more gently. As with all breeds, it is important to socialize Welsh Terriers as early as possible to a wide range of dogs, people, and experiences.


Health
The body of the Welsh Terrier is normal and healthy so that the physique is durable and lasting. Some studies have suggested a genetic predisposition to Primary Lens Luxation which results in secondary glaucoma.

Advice
The Welsh Terrier can adapt to life in the city provided he can go for long walks every day. Brushing once or twice per week is required. This breed should be professionally groomed two to four times per year.

Function
Hunting Dog, Pet.
Dogs
Horse Herd