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Waterside Terrier

Waterside Terrier



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Waterside Terrier
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Breed Organization
Airedale Terrier Club of America
Website: http://www.Airedale.org
Native Country
Great Britain
Other Names
Airedale Terrier, Working Terrier, Bingley Terrier
Life Expectancy
Approximately 10-12 Years
Litter Size
Average of 9 Puppies
Breed Group
AKC Terrier, Terrier

Breed Appearance
The Airedale Terrier Club of America (ATCA) wants you to be an informed Airedale buyer. This information has been prepared to provide a brief general description about the appearance and temperament of the properly bred Airedale Terrier.

The Airedale is a medium-sized, well-boned, squarely-built dog, and at all times a terrier in appearance and attitude. He should stand alert with head and tail held high, be interested and inquisitive, and show an intelligent, steady quality. Airedales are an elegant but sturdy dog, well-balanced and square, with height at the withers being about the same as the length from the front of the shoulder to the buttock. None of the dog's features should be exaggerated. The male has a definitely masculine appearance without being "common or cloddy". The female has a feminine appearance without being fine-boned or looking the least bit fragile. The ears should be alert and the expression eager and intelligent. The tail is carried up and adult Airedales should be self-confident, unafraid of people or other dogs. Intelligent puppies may display a more cautious attitude. Airedales are more reserved in temperament than many of the other terrier breeds, but should not act in a shy or spooky manner when approached by strangers.

In North America there is a divergence of opinions on these matters, particularly with regard to size. We wish to emphasize that there is only one type or standard size of Airedale Terrier. According to the AKC standard, "Dogs should measure approximately 23 inches in height at the shoulder; bitches slightly less. Both sexes should be sturdy, well muscled and boned ... An Airedale much over or under the correct size should be severely penalized (In the show ring)". The source of the diversity of opinion seems to be rooted in history. Airedales were first brought to this country from England in the early 1880's. Their exploits as determined messengers in World War I, made the Airedale a hero. Their reputation combined with their personable temperament produced a meteoric rise in popularity, and by the early 1920's, the Airedale was the most popular breed of dog in America. As a consequence, breeders more interested in money than in preservation of proper breed characteristics and standards flooded the continent with dogs of diminishing quality, widely varying sizes and notably inferior temperaments. Lovers of the breed have stood by their favorite, steadily improving breed quality over the years. Today's properly bred and cared for Airedales have all the intelligence and ability originally found in the breed, but in a more stylish, yet majestic look. He is today, more worthy than ever of his title; "King of the Terriers."


Breed Description
Head: Well proportioned, without wrinkles. Long, flat skull. Stop hardly visible. Flat cheeks. Powerful jaws. Tight lips.
Ears: Small, v-shaped, carried to the side of the head. Topline of folded ear should be slightly above level of the skull.
Eyes: Small, dark color. Very lively expression.
Body: Must not be too long. Muscular neck without dewlap. Chest well let down. Ribs well sprung. Muscular loin. Short, strong, straight back.
Tail: Set high, carried gaily, but not curled over the back. Typically docked.
Hair: Hard, dense, wiry, not so long as to appear shaggy. Hair is straight, dense, and lies close to the skin. Undercoat is shorter and softer.
Coat: Saddle and top of the neck and tail are black or grizzle. All other areas are tan. Ears are often darker tan and a black mixture is often found around the neck and sides of the head. Some white hairs on the front feet are permissible.
Size: Dog: approx. 58 to 61 cm (23-24 in).Bitch: approx. 56 to 59 cm 22-23 in).
Weight: Approx. 20 kg (44 lb).


History
The Airedale Terrier, "King of Terriers," was created around 1850 by breeders in Yorkshire in the valley of Aire who crossed the Otterhound with the Old English Black and Tan Terrier (now extinct). The goal was to produce a dog capable of hunting otter and rodents. The Airedale Terrier was recognized by The Kennel Club in 1886. During World War I, the breed was enlisted as a messenger, attack dog, and sentinel. The Airedale Terrier was introduced in France in the 1920s.

Behavior
This rustic breed is strong, energetic, and full of life. Possessing legendary courage, the speedy Airedale Terrier is always on the alert. He forms a close bond with his owner and is gentle with children. The breed can be dominant, even aggressive with other dogs. The Airedale Terrier has many skills. He is a strong swimmer and is used to hunt ducks and otters as well as boar and deer. He will also valiantly protect his owner and his property. As a working dog, this breed serves in the army and works with police as well as search and rescue teams.

Health
Airedale Terriers in UK, USA, and Canadian surveys had a median lifespan of about 11.5 years, which is similar to other breeds of their size. In a 2004 UK Kennel Club survey, the most common causes of death were cancer (39.5%), old age (14%), urologic (9%), and cardiac (7%) [5]. In a 2000-2001 USA/Canada Health Survey, the most common causes of death were cancer (38%), urologic (17%), old age (12%), and cardiac (6%). Airedales can be affected by hip dysplasia. Like most terriers, they have a propensity towards dermatitis. Skin disorders may go unnoticed in Airedales, because their hard, dense, wiry coats. Itchy skin may be manifest as acral lick dermatitis (caused by licking one area excessively) or acute moist dermatitis or "hot spots" (an oppressively itchy, inflamed and oozing patch of skin, made worse by intense licking and chewing). Allergies, dietary imbalances, and under/over-productive thyroid glands are main causes for skin conditions. Gastric torsion, or bloat, affects Airedales. Bloat can turn and block the stomach, causing a buildup of gas. Bloat can be fatal, it can lead to cardiovascular collapse. Signs of bloat are gastric distress (stomach pain), futile attempts at vomiting, and increased salivation. Bloat usually occurs when the dog is exercised too soon after eating.

Advice
If the Airedale Terrier is to be kept as a house dog, he must have long walks every day. Brushing two times per week is required. This breed should be professionally groomed three times per year.

Function
The Airedale can be used as a working dog and also as a hunter. Airedales exhibit some herding characteristics as well, and have a propensity to chase animals. They have no problem working with cattle and livestock. However, an Airedale that is not well trained will agitate and annoy the animals. Strong-willed, with the tenacity commonly seen in terriers, the Airedale is a formidable opponent.

The Airedale Terrier, like most Terriers, has been bred to hunt independently. As a result, the dog is very intelligent, independent, strong-minded, stoic, and can be stubborn. The Airedale is a dog with a great sense of humour. For those who can laugh along with their Airedale, the dog can provide a unique and entertaining company. For those who don't appreciate being outsmarted by their dog, owning an Airedale can be a trying experience. Patience and consistency in training will be rewarded as the Airedales have been known to reach great heights in competitive obedience, dog agility, and Schutzhund. Airedales can often be difficult to train. Being smart, Airedales pick up what is wanted from them very quickly; being smart, they do not want to keep repeating what they learned and can try to terminate a training session at the point when they "got it". Changing the routine at this point or taking a play-break is much more productive than trying to force the Airedale to continue as they are a stubborn bunch. Airedales require constant reinforcement, or they may decide to start ignoring commands. When training is resumed, they can quickly recover their acceptance of the command. Airedales are a stoic and intrepid breed and as a result, young Airedales exhibit a general lack of common sense and require training. For the same reasons, they need socializing with other dogs early.

They are also very loving, always in the middle of the family activities. Airedales are also known for expressing exactly what they are thinking, unlike more aloof breeds. The Airedale is also a reliable and protective family pet. Airedales are exceedingly loyal and strong dogs; there is one story of an Airedale taking down a bear to protect its master. They are very energetic, and need plenty of exercise.