Canine Breed Menu

Silver Ghost

Silver Ghost

Additional
Silver_Ghost
Pictures
Breed Organization
Weimaraner Club of America
Website: http://www.weimaranerclubofamerica.org
Native Country
Germany
Other Names
Weimaraner Voerstehhund, Weimaraner, Grey Ghost, Weim, Weimer Pointer
Life Expectancy
Approximately 11-13 Years
Litter Size
Average 5-7 Puppies
Breed Group
AKC Sporting
Breed Appearance
The Weimaraner is a silver-grey breed of dog developed originally in early 19th century for hunting. Early Weimaraners were used by royalty for hunting large game, such as boar, bears, and deer. As the popularity of large game hunting began to decline, Weimaraners were used for hunting smaller animals, like fowl, rabbits, and foxes. Rather than having a specific purpose such as pointing or flushing, the Weimaraner is an all purpose gun dog. The Weimaraner is loyal and loving to his family, an incredible hunter, and a fearless guardian of his family and territory. The name comes from the Grand Duke of Weimar, Karl August, whose court enjoyed hunting.

The Weimaraner is elegant, noble, and athletic in appearance. All parts of the dog should be in balance with each other, creating a form that is pleasing to the eye. It must be capable of working in the field, regardless of whether it is from show stock or hunting stock, and faults that will interfere with working ability are heavily penalized.

The tails, which may be amber or gray, are kept short. In some cases, tails are docked and dewclaws are removed, the tail usually docked at birth to a third of its natural length.


Breed Description
Head: Chiseled, in proportion to body size. Very slight stop. Straight nosebridge, often slightly curved. Long, powerful muzzle. Large, flesh-colored nose, darkly pigmented. Powerful jaws. Well-muscled cheeks.
Ears: Set on high, fairly long, slightly rounded at the tip. Turned slightly forward and folded when the dog is alert.
Eyes: Round, very slightly slanted. Light to dark amber. Puppies have light blue eyes.
Body: Slightly elongated. Nobly carried, muscular, well-knit neck. Well pronounced withers. Powerful, well let-down, long chest. Well-curved ribs. Firm, muscular, somewhat long back. Long, moderately sloping croup.
Tail: Set on fairly low, powerful, covered with abundant hair. Hanging down at rest. Carried level to the ground in action. Docked by between one-half and two-thirds its length.
Hair: - Shorthaired variety: short, dense, very thick, lying flat. No or very little undercoat. - Longhaired variety (rare): supple, with or without undercoat. Smooth and slightly wavy. Culotte and feathering. Handsome plume on the tail.
Coat: Silvery grey, brownish-grey, mouse grey, or any intermediate shade. Head and ears generally lighter in color. Minimal white spotting is allowed on the chest and toes. Sometimes there is a more or less pronounced dark stripe down the middle of the back known as an "eel stripe".
Size: Dog: 59 to 70 cm. (23-27.5 in).Bitch: 57 to 65 cm.
Weight: Dog: 30 to 40 kg. (66-88 lb).Bitch: 25 to 35 kg. (55-77 lb).


History
Today's breed standards developed in the 1800s, although the Weimaraner has existed since at least the 1600s in a similar form. It is believed that Continental pointing breeds and mastiffs were its ancestors. The breed was created exclusively for the nobility and alike. The aim was to create a noble-looking, reliable gundog. As ownership was restricted, the breed was highly prized and lived with the family. This was unusual, as during this period, hunting dogs were kept in kennels in packs. This has resulted in a dog that needs to be near humans and that quickly deteriorates when kennelled. The Weimaraner was an all purpose family dog, capable of guarding the home, hunting with the family, and of course, being loving and loyal towards children. Interestingly enough, when the dog was still used for hunting, its instinctual hunting method is to attack the prey's genitals to bring it down.

Originally, Germany was possessive of its skilled all-purpose gundog, but released a pair in the 1950s to America where the breed quickly became popular. Although slower than many other gundogs, such as Pointers, the Weimaraner is thorough and this made it a welcome addition to the sportsman's household. Furthermore, its happy, lively temperament endeared it to families, although it is perhaps too lively for families with young children. Unfortunately, with the rise in popularity, some careless matches were made and some inferior specimens were produced. Since then, both in Britain and America (where the breed remains popular) breeders have taken care to breed for quality and purpose.


Behavior
This enthusiastic dog with a remarkable nose was originally a hound but became a pointer in the nineteenth century. He is a diligent, systematic tracker, though a bit slow, and a confident pointer and water dog. He can track wounded game and retrieve all sorts of quarry. He has a strong predisposition toward guarding and defending. He is a very pleasant companion and needs firm training.

Health
The Weimaraner is a deep-chested dog, which makes them a breed which is high on the list of dogs affected by bloat (gastric torsion). This a very serious condition that causes death when left untreated. It occurs when the stomach twists itself, thereby pinching off the routes of food traveling in or out. Symptoms include a dog showing signs of distress, discomfort, and a swollen stomach. Immediate medical attention is imperitive when bloat occurs and surgery is usually the only option. One way to help prevent bloat is to spread out the Weimaraner's feedings to at least twice daily and to avoid any rigorous exercise right after feedings. Weimaraner owners might never see this problem in their dogs but should be familiar with the ailment and keep emergency vet numbers handy. Hip dysplasia is a major concern among Weimaraners, as with most large breeds of dog. It is generally recommended to acquire Weims only from breeders who have their dog's hips tested using OFA or PennHIP methods.

Other health issues include:
Cryptorchidism
Elbow dysplasia
Distichiasis
Von Willebrands Disease
Entropion
Hypothyroidism
Hypertrophic osteodystrophy
Pituitary dwarfism
Hypomyelinogenesis
Renal dysplasia
Progressive retinal atrophy


Advice
Weimaraners are fast and powerful dogs, but are also suitable home animals given appropriate training & exercise. These dogs are not as sociable towards strangers as other hunting dogs such as Labradors and Golden Retrievers. Weimaraners are very protective of their family and can be very territorial. They can be aloof to strangers, and must be thoroughly socialized when young to prevent aggression. They are also highly intelligent, sensitive and problem-solving animals, which earned them an epithet "dog with a human brain". From adolescence, a Weimaraner requires extensive exercise in keeping with an energetic hunting dog breed and prized for their physical endurance and stamina. No walk is too far, and they will appreciate games and play in addition. An active owner is more likely to provide the vigorous exercising, games, or running that this breed absolutely requires. Weimaraners are high-strung, requiring appropriate training to learn how to calm them and to help them learn to control their behavior. Owners need patience and consistent, firm (yet kind) training, as this breed is particularly rambunctious during the first year and a half of its life. Like many breeds, untrained and unconfined young dogs often create their own fun when left alone, such as chewing house quarters and furniture. Thus, many that are abandoned have behavioural issues as a result of isolation and inferior exercise. It should never be forgotten that the Weimaraner is a hunting dog and therefore has a strong, instinctive prey drive. Weimaraners will sometimes tolerate cats, as long as they are introduced to the cats as puppies, but many will chase and frequently kill almost any small animal that enters their garden or backyard. In rural areas, most Weimaraners will not hesitate to chase deer or sheep. However, with good training, these instincts can be curtailed to some degree. A properly trained Weimaraner is a wonderful companion that will never leave its master's side.

Function
Hunting Dog, Watchdog and Defense Dog, Companion Dog.


Dogs
Horse Herd